Rug Options

Rugs are a good option for some rooms. There are a vast arrange or styles and colours. And because they are easily removed they can be easier to clean and easily changed. A different rug for summer and winter is no problem. Or you can keep a good rug for when you have company.

 

Natural Rug Materials

Wool

Always a high quality option, wool feels good underfoot and will tend to look quite classy. It will also last quite a while and be reasonably fire-retardant. The downside is that wool is a little expensive. And some people have wool allergies.

 

Silk

These are very fine looking rugs, often with ornate designs. Yet they are expensive, and usually used for wall decoration rather than floor coverings.

 

Cotton.

This is pleasant but ordinary, and not hard wearing. These can be fine for door and bathroom mats, perhaps for children’s play areas. But not a long lasting option.

 

Jute and Sisal

Flat woven rugs from India & Bangladesh, some people find these natural fibre mats quite appealing. They are inexpensive and have an old world/ tropic climate look. They are not long lasting, but easily replaced.

 

Bamboo Silk

A cheap but reasonable alternative to real silk. This is a renewable resource, and perhaps a good option for those whose budget cannot accommodate silk or its short lifespan.

 

Artificial Rug Materials

Polypropylene,

There are many variations on Polypropylene rugs. The quality varies, but they are all inexpensive, hardwearing and easy to clean. Most look cheap, but Heat-set and Frese Polypropylene are superior quality and comparable to reasonable quality natural fibres.

 

Artificial silk.

Viscose, Rayon, Polyester can be processes to look like silk. Though quite cheap they clean well and are reasonably long lasting.

 

Polyester.

This is similar to polypropylene, but a little better in quality. It has a more pleasant, shinier look and feels better than most artificial fibres. It is very hard wearing, so will last for many years.

 

Viscose

Made by processing wood this fibre is a little like silk. On its own it is rather prone to crushing, but it can produce pleasing results combined with wool or processed like rayon. A mid-range option.

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